A New Idea To The Health Insurance Crisis In America

Lack of health insurance coverage for over 41 million Americans is one of the nation’s most pressing problems. While most elderly Americans have coverage through Medicare and nearly two-thirds of non-elderly Americans receive health coverage through employer-sponsored plans, many workers and their families remain uninsured because their employer does not offer coverage or they cannot afford the cost of coverage. Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) or HAWK-I here in Iowa help fill in the gaps for low-income children and some of their parents, but the reach of these programs is limited. As a result, millions of Americans without health insurance face adverse health consequences because of delayed or foregone health care and extending coverage to the uninsured has become a national priority. -(Information taken from kff.org)

The number of people that are forced to go without health insurance is nothing less than a crisis in this country today. We have fallen into a vicious cycle over the last few decades in which health insurance premiums have become too expensive for even a middle class family to afford. This in turn results in the inability of the uninsured to cover medical costs which often times results in the financial ruins of the family, and in turn results in the continuing loss of income by the medical community, which in turn drives the cost of medical expenses higher, finally cycling back to the insurance company which then must drive the premiums of health insurance higher to help cover the rising cost of health care.

Many proposals have been tossed around by politicians on both sides of the isle ranging from socializing health care comparable to the Canadian system, to endorsing health savings accounts and cracking down on frivolous law suits against the medical community. Many of these proposals have good points, but along with whatever good points they bring they also bring major downfalls. For instance; a socialized national health care program would eliminate the need for health insurance all together and the cost would be taken on by taxes, which in theory doesn’t seem like a bad idea. However, the downfalls to this system include a deficit in new doctors willing to get into the field due to the inevitable decline in income while the demand would grow due to no personal responsibility. In short if people didn’t have to worry about deductibles or copays that would normally keep the person from seeking medical treatment for minor things, they would simply go to the doctor every time they had an ache or pain. So now we have waiting lines for people with major health problems since everyone is scheduling an appointment while at the same time we are loosing doctors due to lack of incentive.

The current battle cry by the republican Bush administration is to push HSA’s (Health Savings Accounts) which reduce premium by taking a less expensive high deductible health insurance plan with a tax deferred savings account that earns a small interest on the side that you contribute to along with your premiums each month. Any money withdrawn from the savings account for qualified medical expenses are taken “tax-free”, and unlike a flex spending account like many people are familiar with in employer based plans, you don’t lose the money you put into the account that you don’t use. Basically if you never used any of that money in the savings account you could withdrawal or roll it over into another vehicle once you turn 62 1/2 penalty free to be used for retirement. This is a viable option for some people, however for many the premiums for these plans are still too expensive, and the problem remains that if you need major treatment in the first few years of the policy you will not have a big enough amount in the savings account to help cover the gaps leaving that person responsible for a large portion of the cost out of pocket.

Now we come to what I believe is one of the biggest problems from a health insurance agent’s point of view, which is the inability for persons with pre-existing health conditions to obtain coverage. From the number of people that contact my office searching for health insurance coverage, I would have to say that about half of them have a health condition that will either result in an insurance company declining that persons application, or result in an amendment rider which basically excludes coverage for any claims related to that condition. An example of a condition that I run across constantly is hypertension or high blood pressure. This condition will sometimes result in a company declining an application all together if other factors are involved, but most generally result in an amendment exclusion rider. You may think that this isn’t that big of a deal, after all, blood pressure medicine is about the only thing they would have to pay for out of pocket, but what many people don’t realize is that this rider will exclude ANYTHING that could be considered part of this condition including heart attacks, strokes, and aneurisms which would all result in a huge out of pocket claim. Consider the fact that my father had a double by-pass surgery recently that ended up with a final bill of around $150,000. This whole amount would have had to come out of pocket had he had a hypertension rider on his health insurance policy, not to mention the added cost of 2 months off of work thrown into the mix. On a modest income of $40,000 per year this would have ruined him financially.

So what how do we fix this problem? Obviously the proposals thus far have been flawed from the beginning, and even if one of these plans gained support from the American people chances are it would never be passed into law simply due to political infighting. One side wants to keep health care privatized while the other wants to socialize it, which as we discussed before both have upsides and downsides. It seems that we are doomed on this issue and there is no real ideas or light at the of the tunnel right? Maybe not, let me tell you about a client I had in my office a couple of years ago.

A young woman came in wanting to compare health insurance plans to see if there were any options for her and her family. She had several children and had been on Title 19 Medicaid and had been going to college paid by the state. She had recently graduated from college and had gotten a job with the local school system, however for whatever reason she was not eligible for health insurance benefits. Obviously she still couldn’t afford 5 or 6 hundred dollars per month for a plan so she went back to the aid office and explained her situation. They ended up working with us to find an acceptable private health insurance plan and reimbursed her for a percentage of the cost which I didn’t even know was possible!

This got me thinking, consider how many more people would be able to obtain coverage if they could be reimbursed by the government a percentage of the premium according to their income. For example; take a young married couple in their 20’s with one child, let’s say that their family income is $25,000 and that the average premium for a $500 deductible health insurance plan for them is $450. Just as an example let’s say that the government determined that a three person family with an annual income of $25,000 is reimbursed 50% of their premium taking the actual cost to the family to $225 per month. This is now an affordable enough premium for the family to consider.

With this merging of private insurance with government assistance we get the best of both worlds. Of course the next question goes to cost, how much more would this cost the American tax payer and how much would this raise taxes? I don’t think that it would cost the tax payers much more an here’s why I think that: First off we would bring down significantly the amount of uninsured people that are unable to pay for the medical care they get in turn driving down the total cost of health care. Secondly the number of people that are forced into bankruptcy and driven to Medicaid Title 19 assistance due to medical bills stemming from catastrophic medical conditions that don’t have health insurance coverage would be significantly reduced. This is important to keep in mind considering that once someone is on Medicaid they are receiving health care basically 100% covered by the government so there is no more incentive to not seek treatment for minor or non-existing conditions. On the flip side many conditions that would have not been caught before they became severe because a person didn’t seek treatment due to not having insurance coverage would now be caught before they turned into a catastrophic claim. Finally, if the government allocated a certain amount of money to help cover claims by people that have pre-existing conditions the private insurance companies could do away with exclusions and declines due to already existing health problems, this is already done is some states such as the HIPIOWA Iowa Comprehensive Plans which insures Iowa residents that can not obtain coverage elsewhere.

You may be sitting there thinking that this is all just wishful thinking and that these ideas could never be implemented, but all of these ideas are already being implemented. The problem is that only some states do some programs and not even most health insurance agents know that some low income families can get reimbursed for health insurance premiums. If these programs were all standardized and put into effect on a national well publicized level I believe it would put one hell of a dent in the uninsured population in this country. Now I don’t pretend to know what the reimbursement levels should be for what income levels but I do know that anything is better than nothing,

Eating Disorders In The Middle East

One of the least reported issues in the Middle East is the dramatic increase in obesity and eating disorders. Throughout Kuwait, Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and throughout the United Arab Emirates, cases of obesity are on the rise.

It is estimated by the International Diabetes Foundation that over thirty-seven million people in this area have Type 2 diabetes and only about half of those are diagnosed. While this is high, the same report indicates that with the lack of education and mental health support for eating disorders, these numbers could easily double over the next two decades.

Lifestyle and Food Choices

Two of the factors driving this rise in obesity are lifestyle and food choices. The lifestyle tends to be very sedentary without a lot of physical activity. This is particularly true for the upper to middle class families in the area, which is where the obesity issue is most dramatic.

Tied to this are the cultural issues around food. Food is seen as a way to celebrate. This includes large meals, multiple food items to choose from and an emphasis on socialising around food. Additionally, in most of these areas, going out to eat at luxurious restaurants is not just an occasional event, it is common practice.

Food Addiction

To compound matters the rich, calorie-dense food is seen as such a part of daily life, socialising and celebrating, so it becomes a comfort to people. When this is intertwined with the stigma of working with mental health professionals for issues such as depression, anxiety or addictions, it may become the way that individuals cope with stress in their lives.

In addition to food addiction, or the need for food to calm or soothe individuals, there is also an increasing rate of eating disorders from bulimia and anorexia to binge eating disorders. Give the current lack of focus on changing these issues; these numbers are also anticipated to rise dramatically over the next few years.

Red Manhood Protection From Cold Weather

Now that cold weather is blowing through, winter is definitely here. While even warm weather aficionados can find some things about the cold they like (hot chocolate, roaring fires, an excuse to stay inside and binge watch), it’s equally true that even cold weather fans can find drawbacks. And for men, that includes getting a red manhood from freezing temperatures and bitter icy winds. Finding ways to keep the member sufficiently warm during these winter months is part of good male organ care.

Red manhood

Now, there’s usually nothing wrong with a red manhood. Men who are fair-skinned tend to get a red manhood when it becomes firm, as the blood rushing into the engorged member causes a change in coloration. But sometimes a red manhood can signal a problem, such as being far too cold.

Anyone who has ever jumped into a pool of cold water has witnessed a cold red manhood � and one that is usually shriveled. But when the male organ is exposed to extreme cold temperatures for a prolonged time, it may actually get a little swollen and can experience extreme pain.

In some severe cases, a red manhood may be an indication of frostbite (or frostnip, an early stage condition of frostbite). Frostbite is accompanied by a numbness (lack of feeling or deadened feeling), swelling, blistering and fever, although not all men may experience all of these symptoms. If a man suspects he has a frostbitten member or other body part, he should seek medical attention. Severe frostbite can destroy tissue and in extreme cases may lead to amputation.

Keeping warm

To help fight that winter cold, there are several ways to keep the manhood warm during the winter.

�Don’t go commando. First and foremost, men who habitually walk around without underwear should suspend that habit when venturing out into winter weather. The cold weather can be too dangerous to male organ health, no matter how nice the feeling of freedom may be.

�Stand in front of a fire. Spending a few minutes in front of a fireplace can help warm up a member so it withstands the cold better during its first minutes outside.

�Give the member a rub. Similarly, taking a couple of minutes to rub and massage the manhood before tackling the cold can be beneficial. This will get the blood circulating and help deflect the initial cold.

�Tuck it in. If he is only going to be outside for a few minutes, a guy can try tucking his manhood between his legs for extra warmth. However, since it will pop out relatively quickly, this is a very short term solution.

�Layer up. Doubling up on underwear is strongly advised. Just as a guy may wear a shirt, sweater and coat to combat the cold, so should he consider wearing more than one pair of underwear. The bottom layer should be tight briefs, an athletic supporter or compression shorts, each of which will fit the male organ more snugly.

�Go thermal. It can also help to wear thermal underwear, which may add an extra layer of warmth to the region.

�Investigate wind briefs. Many runners wear wind briefs, specially designed underwear with an extra layer of protection in the midsection.

�Wear a member warmer. A man can invest in an actual knitted member warmer � or simply wear a (clean) sock over the organ when temperatures get frosty.

Taking steps to prevent a red manhood due to cold weather pays off. So does taking steps to ensure overall male organ health, such as regularly applying a top drawer male organ health crme (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). For best results, a guy should select a crme that is going to �cover all the bases� by including the major vitamins necessary for member health promotion � A, B5, C, D and E. In addition, the crme should include L-arginine, an amino acid which helps manhood blood vessels expand so they can accommodate a greater flow of blood.